Protecting children in substance-abusing families
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Protecting children in substance-abusing families

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Published by National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect in [U.S.] .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementVickie Kropenske and Judy Howard with Cheryl Breitenbach ...[et al.].
SeriesUser manual series / National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect
ContributionsHoward, Judy., National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19221931M

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" Children of Substance-Abusing Parents: Dynamics and Treatment " is a necessary reference for all mental health professionals and students who need to understand and treat this population. It offers an invaluable look at treatment options and programmatic interventions across the life span and fills an important gap in the current literature/5(2). Safeguarding and Protecting Children, Young People and Families 'This is an excellent book that clearly assess the challenges faced by children and families and those responsible for their care. Relevant case studies with activites, encourage a deeper understanding of the role and responsibilities of health professionals in safeguarding. Kowal, L. (). Visualizing help for children living with family violence and substance addicted parents. Protecting Children, 6(4), Kropenske, V. & Howard, J. (). Protecting children in substance-abusing families. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families. Introduction. A growing body of literature suggests that substance abuse has distinct effects on different family structures. For example, the parent of small children may attempt to compensate for deficiencies that his or her substance‐abusing spouse has developed as a consequence of that substance abuse (Brown and Lewis ).Frequently, children may act as surrogate spouses for the parent.

The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery focuses on the effects of substance abuse on families, parenting, and the parent-child relationship. Combining experiential and didactic exercises, the approach is designed to enhance parents' self-awareness and thereby increase their capacity to understand their children. If you, or a family member, needs help with a mental or substance use disorder, call SAMHSA’s National Helpline at HELP () or TTY: , or use SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator to get help. References and Relevant Resources. National Survey on Drug Use and Health | Substance Abuse and Mental. dependent or substance-abusing parent. 1 Of these children, approximately million lived with a parent who was dependent on or abused alcohol, and about million lived with a parent who was dependent on or abused illicit drugs. While many of these children will not experience abuse or neglect, they are at increased risk forFile Size: KB. Parents Guides to Protecting Your Children From Child Abuse For Cub Scouts and their parents For Cub Scouts and their parents (in Spanish) For Scouts BSA members and their parents For Scouts BSA members and their parents (in Spanish) For STEM Scouts and their parents.

Get this from a library! Protecting children in substance-abusing families. [Vickie Kropenske; Judy Howard; National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (U.S.)]. areas of child protection, child welfare and social work and in recent years has developed a particular interest in studying and comparing child protection policies and systems in different jurisdictions. Recent books include 'Child Protection: International Trends and Orientations' (edited with N . But a number of studies have indicated that substance-abusing parents display low levels of cooperation in intervention programs for themselves and their children (Kelley, D'Lima, Henson, & Cotten. Enhancing the effectiveness of residential treatment for substance abusing pregnant and parenting women: focus on maternal reflective functioning and mother–child relationship. Infant Mental Health Journal, 27 (5), –